10 Ways How China Had Overreacted To Liu Xiaobo’s Peace Prize

Liu Xiaobo's empty chair at the Nobel Peace Pr...

Image by radiowood2000 via Flickr

Recently, Nobel Prize Committee had awarded the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize to a Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo, who is serving an 11-year prison sentence for “inciting subversion of state power,” and to say that Chinese government was not pleased with the choice of the winner would be a major understatement.  Here are 10 ways how China reacted (and overreacted) to the Liu Xiaobo’s Nobel Peace Prize.

1)  The Chinese government had put the Liu Xiaobo’s wife under house arrest, jailed his lawyer, blamed West for a conspiracy, urged Chinese residents of Norway to protest the Nobel Prize ceremony, all that just to advertise the fact that a Chinese citizen finally won a Nobel peace prize.

2) Chinese Communist party had insisted that arresting someone the government does not like does not constitute a human rights violation.  When your country does it, it is protection of national security interests, and it is only a human right violation if some other country does it.

3) China had convinced 19 other countries not to attend the Nobel Prize ceremony.  However, two of these 19 countries, Ukraine and the Philippines have reconsidered and attended the ceremony.  Ukraine attended because they had heard the food at the reception is really good, and Philippines attended to help clean up after the ceremony.

4) Chinese government did not allow anyone else to receive the Nobel prize for the winner, because it had calculated that having an empty chair prominently displayed at the Nobel Prize ceremony would be beneficial for Chinese furniture industry.

5) In absence of the real Nobel Prize winner, the Nobel prize was symbolically given to an empty chair.  In response, thousands of Chinese Twitter users changed their profiles pictures to a picture of an empty chair.  And in response to that, Chinese government officials changed their profile pictures to a picture of an empty electric chair.

6) In retaliation, China had created and awarded its own Confucius Peace prize to Lien Chan, former vice president of Taiwan.  The prize winner’s spokesman had told the media that they had never heard about this prize, to which Chinese officials replied that the Confucius Peace prize is as much about peace as it is about learning.

7) Because the Confucius Peace Prize winner never showed up either, and it would have been silly to give both prizes to the empty chairs, the prize committee had given the prize to a 6-year old girl because “children symbolize peace and future”.  However, so that the she would be eligible to receive the prize and able to symbolize peace and future, the officials had to make some minor adjustments to the girl’s birth certificate.

8) Complained that this Nobel prize winner had made no actual contribution to the world peace to deserve to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.  Although, when did it ever stop the Nobel prize committee from awarding the Peace Prize?

9) Blocked the access to the rest of this post.

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About List of X

An Ostensibly Funny Commentary* of the Recent News and Events. (* warning! may not actually be funny or a commentary. Also, since I am not quite sure what "ostensibly" means, it might not be "ostensibly" either.) Blogging at listofx.com
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One Response to 10 Ways How China Had Overreacted To Liu Xiaobo’s Peace Prize

  1. We should seriously rethink our economic engagement with China: http://andreasmoser.wordpress.com/2010/10/15/liu-xiaobo/

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